Looking for a New Challenge?

CEA is built as an R&D project. We scout new research paradigms and use the CEA as a vehicle to account for trade-offs and interdependencies of urban building energy systems. To this end, we regularly host master students and exchange researchers in our labs in Singapore and Zurich. If you are interested in collaborating with us on new research questions and developing them in the CEA, you may refer to the proposed topics below or contact us for more information.

Featured topics:


Temperature set-backs and lighting control strategies in community energy systems performance

Setback temperature and lighting control systems offer the possibility to save high amounts of energy in community energy systems. The effect of such factors at the urban scale can tremendously constrain the demand of energy in buildings. This thesis aims at analyzing the effects of these factors on the demand and production of energy in a case of real urban transformation. The by-product of such analysis will be a new library for the City Energy Analyst. An open-source tool for the analysis of community energy systems in cities. This Master thesis can be developed in Singapore. A minimum stay of 3 months in Singapore (according to the case) will be necessary.

Contact:
Gabriel Happle
e-mail

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General model of moisture transfer in buildings

The goal of this thesis is to build a model for moisture transfer in buildings, which is similar to the existing Resistance-Capacitance (RC) model for heat transfer (ISO 13790-2008) used for space sensible heating and cooling load calculation. However, in hot and humid climate, accurate description of moisture transfer by transmission is crucial for latent cooling load calculation. Therefore, an accurate dynamic moisture transfer model in buildings is the foundation to study cooling energy supply systems in the hot and humid climates. This thesis work involves researching on moisture transfer and storage of building materials, constructing a model accounting for moisture transfer through transmission, ventiliation and internal gains in buildings. Finally, calibrating the model with real-time measured data from an office building in Singapore. The by-product of such analysis will be a new library for the City Energy Analyst, an open-source tool for the analysis of community energy systems in cities.

Contact:
Gabriel Happle
e-mail


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Internal thermal comfort analysis in buildings at the community scale.

Thermal comfort in buildings is essential for working and living in buidlings. This thesis aims at analyzing the effects of changes in thermal comfort (temperature and relative humidity levels) into de future demand and supply of energy in neighborhoods. The by-product of such analysis will be a new library for the City Energy Analyst, an open-source tool for the analysis of community energy systems in cities. This Master thesis can be developed in Singapore. A minimum stay of 3 months in Singapore (according to the case) will be necessary.

Contact:
Gabriel Happle
e-mail


Sensitivity Analysis of Solar Irradiance in Urban Areas 

Paul Neitzel
Msc. Integrated Building Systems - ETH Zurich

Solar irradiance is a parameter that influences the demand and supply options of energy in urban areas.  It highly affects the needs for heating, cooling, and solar generation capabilities of buildings. Solar irradiance simulation models need to go under a calibration process in order to produce reliable predictions. A first step of this calibration process is to get knowledge on first and secondary effects of input parameters into forecasts of energy demand and generation.

This research analyzed the effect of input parameters of solar irradiance calculation on the energy demand and photovoltaic (PV) potential of urban areas. Furthermore, this research introduced an advanced radiation model for the City Energy Analyst based on DAYSIM software.